Max Cryer Profile

Gareth Shute
4 Jul 2019

The career of Max Cryer is hard to summarise given that his work has spanned across television, radio, the stage, and the printed word. He is well-known as the author of a wide range of non-fiction books, with new work always on the go. What is often overlooked are his achievements as a musical performer, who has released many Max Cryer and the Children albums, performed in countless musical productions, and toured repeatedly through the US.

Max Cryer got started in music at a young age, first with piano lessons and then a spell as a double- bass player in an orchestra. “I started playing piano when I was five – first by ear and then I learned to read music,” he told AudioCulture in 2017. “Singing came quite naturally after that and although I’d never thought seriously about taking it up, it was discovered that I had good pitch and a wide range. So I took lessons and won a scholarship for singing training.”

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Eliza Keil with Max Cryer in Camelot.
Photo credit: Eliza Keil collection
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Max Cryer - Do Re Max! (Zodiac, 1966)
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Max Cryer, 1965.
Photo credit: Auckland Libraries
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Prince Charles meets Max Cryer, Miss New Zealand (Carol Robinson), Corben Simpson and Bunny Walters at Superpop 70 in Auckland
Photo credit: Corben Simpson Collection
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Max Cryer and the Children's single 'Rubber Duckie', arranged by Garth Young, from the Philips LP Merry-Go-Max, 1971. 
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Max Cryer and the Children, 1972.
Photo credit: Max Cryer collection
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Ray Columbus and Max Cryer - A Girl To Watch Music By (1969)
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Max Cryer and the Children - Town Cryer (Zodiac, 1966)
Photo credit: RNZ collection
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Max Cryer, 2018.
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Phil Warren with entertainer Max Cryer in 1990
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1976: Ray Columbus, Bob Hughes (Australian Writer Director on the APRA board), Max Cryer and Pat Bell
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Max Cryer as the King of Siam in 'The King and I'.
Photo credit: Max Cryer collection
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Max Cryer at the 1976 Apra Silver Scroll, Auckland. 
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Three stalwarts of New Zealand entertainment after receiving their royal honours in 1995: from left, Robin Scholes, Max Cryer, and Suzanne Prentice.
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Max Cryer and the Children - Pop Goes Max (PolyGram, 1974)
Photo credit: RNZ collection
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Eliza Keil with Max Cryer in Camelot.
Photo credit: Eliza Keil collection
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Superpop '70, a concert held at Western Springs, Auckland, featured local performers including The Chicks and Bunny Walters. Produced by Max Cryer, the event was broadcast live and attended by Prince Charles and Princess Anne, who were visiting New Zealand with their parents.
Photo credit: Judy Donaldson collection
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Las Vegas, 1971: Frankie Stevens, John Rowles and Max Cryer get together while all three were performing simultaneously in the city. 
Photo credit: Frankie Stevens collection
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Max Cryer and the Children - Pop Goes Max (PolyGram, 1974). The album, produced by Julian Lee, featured songs such as 'Yellow Submarine' and 'Feelin' Groovy'. 
Photo credit: RNZ collection
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Max Cryer, Dinah Lee and Millie Small advertise Aywon stretch slacks in Playdate magazine, 1966.
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Max Cryer and the Children's 1968 single, 'Talk to the Animals', from the film musical Dr Doolittle. 
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Max Cryer in a Tip-Top Trumpet ice cream advertisement, 1964.
Photo credit: Max Cryer collection
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Max Cryer and the Children - Uncle Max (PolyGram, 1974)
Photo credit: RNZ collection
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The very first performance of Max Cryer and the Children on New Zealand television, 1966
Photo credit: Max Cryer collection
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Max Cryer's Ted Talk on the evolution of the English language, 2015
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Max Cryer and the Children - Town Cryer (Zodiac, 1966)
Photo credit: RNZ collection
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Zodiac


PolyGram


Philips

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