House Of Nimrod Profile

Andrew Schmidt
9 May 2013

In late 1967, House of Nimrod gobbled up New Zealand’s Christmas pop charts with the mischievous oddity ‘Slightly-Delic’, a song experimenting with the sound of the summer – harmony-laden psychedelic pop.

A chance meeting between Bryce Petersen, a North Shore based children’s folk singer/songwriter, and Australian guitarist Johnny Breslin, produced enough creative sparks for a band and two singles. Breslin had been trying to get a group together and knew a 20 year-old drummer from South Auckland, Billy Lawton, late of The Plague (with Corben Simpson). Lawton knew a blues playing guitarist and philosophy student Tony Pilcher (21) and young Māori bass guitarist Larry Latimer (20).

Show more +
ImageableImage
The original copyright note for the House Of Nimrod's classic single Slightly-Delic
ImageableImage
House Of Nimrod
ImageableImage
Eddie Hayson with The House Of Nimrod Mk.2 at the 1969 Battle of The Bands at Auckland's YMCA
ImageableImage
New vocalist Tony McNulty with The House Of Nimrod Mk.2 at the 1969 Battle of The Bands at Auckland's YMCA
ImageableImage
Billy Lawton with The House Of Nimrod Mk.2 at the 1969 Battle of The Bands at Auckland's YMCA
ImageableImage
Tony Pilcher with The House Of Nimrod Mk.2 at the 1969 Battle of The Bands at Auckland's YMCA.
ImageableImage
House Of Nimrod
3 col el, class=LabelPerson::ActiveRecord_Associations_CollectionProxy
Labels:

Festival

3 col el, class=EmbeddableItem
Slightly-delic
3 col el, class=RelatedPage::ActiveRecord_Associations_CollectionProxy 3 col el, class=CollaborationPerson::ActiveRecord_Associations_CollectionProxy
Members:

Bryce Petersen - vocals

Johnny Breslin - guitar

Larry Latimer - bass

John Pilcher - guitar

Bill Lawton - drums

3 col el, class=Trivia::ActiveRecord_Associations_CollectionProxy
Trivia:

Larry Latimer was the son of (Sir) Graham Latimer, a leading Māori politician. 

Bryce Petersen’s son Carey fronted Auckland Walk in the mid-1980s.

Bryce Petersen would also write Lew Pryme's provocative ‘Gracious Lady (Alice Dee)’ in 1968 and Robert Gennari's single 'I Really Don't Care' in the same year.