Ian Magan Profile

Trevor Reekie
27 Jul 2018

Ian Magan is a pioneer of both commercial radio and concert promotion in New Zealand. He is equally a man who is considered a true gentleman. Loyalty and “old school” values, hard work and a genuine passion for music have been at the foundations of Magan’s career, one that further confirms the adage “The show must go on!”

A week or so before I spoke to Ian in December 2017 he sent me an email saying: “Ironically your invitation to come on this programme [Radio NZ] comes at a time when I am virtually getting my head around being ‘retired’ and allowing myself to reflect on spectacular and priceless memories of 16 years in Radio followed by 42 years as a Concert Promoter.”

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At the 1984 Apra Silver Scroll, from left: promoter Ian Magan, unidentified, Radio Hauraki's John McCready and Jill Magan
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Ian Magan on Rock The Boat: The Story of Radio Hauraki (2)
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Ian Magan and David Gapes discuss Radio Hauraki, 2014
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A very weary Ian Magan, after moderating two days of contentious panels at the 1987 Kiwi Music Convention in Wellington, attended by 300 musicians and industry representatives. The lack of radio airplay was the main topic. Magan's role was a very big task, said Tony Chance of Rianz in the closing moments. "To come up here and front to everyone, to control the situation and a forum that we thought could have got out of hand, and just get it going and get positive results out of it. I can't think of anyone else in the country that could have done it." Ian replied, "Thank you very much. It's over."
Photo credit: Jocelyn Carlin
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Ian Magan on Rock The Boat: The Story of Radio Hauraki (3)
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Ian Magan on 'The Beat Goes On'
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Ian Magan on Rock The Boat: The Story of Radio Hauraki (1)
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Radio Hauraki pioneers celebrate the station's first anniversary with some fans. 
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The poster for Fred Dagg's sell-out national tour, 1976. The promoter was Ian Magan. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, Eph-D-Variety-1976-01
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When The Cat's Away's tour group on the Asian Paradise tour, 2001: George Gorga (front of house sound), Robbie Barclay (production manager), Dave McIvor (crew), Marty Reynolds (lighting), Tony Flett (stage), Paul Lopez (crew), Colin Burrell (monitors), Rick Brown (stage), Ian Magan (promoter) and sprawled across the band, Chris Tate (sound). In front: Sharon O'Neill, Debbie Harwood, Kim Willoughby, Margaret Urlich and Annie Crummer.
Photo credit: Photo by Mark Roach
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Ian Magan holds a black Les Paul guitar, given to him by Split Enz after the band's "final" performance at the Logan Campbell Centre, Auckland, December 1984. In front are, from left: manager Nathan Brennan, Eddie Rayner, Paul Hester. At back, from left: Nigel Griggs, Noel Crombie, Neil Finn, Tim Finn, and Ian Magan. 
Photo credit: Bryan Staff
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Promotor Ian Magan with Tim Finn in the early 1980s. Magan, a "pirate" founder of Radio Hauraki, worked with Split Enz for a decade as their promoter, from the 1975 university tours to the later stadium shows.
Photo credit: Photo by Murray Cammick
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Ian Magan at the microphone during his days as a pioneering Radio Hauraki DJ. 
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